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Mexico

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On December 10, 2019, at an event in Mexico’s National Palace, the modifying protocol  agreement to finalize the US-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement (USMCA) (that will replace the North American Free Trade Agreement or NAFTA).was signed in the presence of Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, by Canada’s Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland, Mexico’s Undersecretary of Foreign Affairs for North America Jesus Seade, and US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer. The signing was made possible by an agreement…

On December 10, 2019, House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Ways and Means Chairman, Richard Neal announced in a press conference, that they had reached a deal with the White House on the US-Mexico-Canada (USMCA) trade agreement. Neal outlined some of the changes in the deal reached with the White House on the USMCA Trade Agreement on labor and environmental enforcement rules, drug pricing, and other issues. The changes must be agreed to by Mexico…

On October 24, 2019, the Office of the US Trade Representative (USTR) published in the Federal Register an invitation for applications [Docket No. USTR-2019-0018] from eligible individuals wishing to be included on the roster of individuals to serve on binational panels convened to review final determinations in antidumping or countervailing duty (AD/CVD) proceedings and amendments to AD/CVD statutes of a NAFTA Party for the period April 1, 2020, through March 31, 2021. The United States…

On July 29, 2019, the Diario Oficial de la Federacion (the official Federal Gazette) published the Presidential Decree approving the Protocol replacing the North American Free Trade Agreement with the Treaty between the United Mexican States, the United States of America and Canada, made in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on November 30 of two thousand eighteen, as well as the six parallel agreements between the Government of the United Mexican States and the Government of the…

On May 30, 2019, President Trump announced that, beginning on June 10, 2019, the United States will impose additional duties on all articles imported into the United States from Mexico (via land, sea or air) on an escalating schedule until Mexico does more to stop the flow of illegal migrants to the United States. This tweet was then followed by a longer statement issued by the White House (available here). That statement accuses Mexico of…

On May 19, 2019, President Trump signed Proclamation 9893 of May 19, 2019 on Adjusting Imports of Aluminum into the United States (published in the Federal Register on May 23, 2019) and Proclamation 9894 of May 19, 2019 on Adjusting Imports of Steel into the United States (published in the Federal Registeron May 21, 2019), which remove the 10% duties on aluminum and 25% duties on steel for goods originating in Canada and Mexico, while…

On May 20, 2019, the Diario Oficial published a Decree, signed by President López Obrador, which modifies the earlier Decree (published on June 5, 2018) setting the applicable duty rate for goods originating in the United States and the Decree establishing various Sectoral Promotion Programs. The Decree repeals Articles 1, 2 and 9 of the June 5, 2018 Decree and removes the duties imposed by Mexico in retaliation for steel and aluminum tariffs imposed on…

On May 17, 2019, the President of Mexico issued a statement indicating that the US and Mexico had reach an agreement on the aluminum and steel tariffs imposed under Section 232 of the (U.S.) Trade Expansion Act of 1962. An official translation of the statement follows: Agreement between the United States and Mexico on Section 232 Tariffs on steel and aluminum After negotiations between Mexico and the United States on the steel and aluminum tariffs…

The entry into force of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) brings with it preferential import tariff rates applicable to CPTPP originating goods. Import tariffs can amount to a substantial increase on the end cost of goods. For businesses operating in a competitive market, preferential tariff rates may afford them a comparative advantage by reducing costs. Under the CPTPP, tariff rate reductions occur automatically after the Agreement has entered into force in a member country’s territory. Accordingly, exporters of most CPTPP originating goods can enjoy preferential tariff rates immediately.

On April 18, 2019, the US International Trade Commission (ITC) released its 379 page report, U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement: Likely Impact on the U.S. Economy and on Specific Industry Sectors [Inv. TPA 105-003, Pub. No. 4889], as required by the section 105(c) of the Bipartisan Congressional Trade Priorities and Accountability Act of 2015 (Title I, Pub. L. 114-26; 129 Stat. 320).   The highlights of the report are contained in the Executive Summary which states (with emphasis as in the original text):