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On May 19, 2019, President Trump signed Proclamation 9893 of May 19, 2019 on Adjusting Imports of Aluminum into the United States (published in the Federal Register on May 23, 2019) and Proclamation 9894 of May 19, 2019 on Adjusting Imports of Steel into the United States (published in the Federal Registeron May 21, 2019), which remove the 10% duties on aluminum and 25% duties on steel for goods originating in Canada and Mexico, while…

On May 20, 2019, the Department of Finance announced that effective today, Canada is lifting its retaliatory countermeasures against the U.S. When the United States imposed unjustified tariffs on Canadian steel and aluminum, the Government of Canada stood up for our country’s steel and aluminum workers, industries, and communities – imposing reciprocal, dollar-for-dollar countermeasures against imports of steel, aluminum, and other products from the U.S., to encourage the full removal of the U.S. tariffs. “Canada stood firm…

After extensive discussions on trade in steel and aluminum covered by the action taken pursuant to Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962 (19 U.S.C. §1862), the United States and Canada have reached an understanding as follows: 1. The United States and Canada agree to eliminate, no later than two days from the issuance of this statement: a. All tariffs the United States imposed under Section 232 on imports of aluminum and steel…

The entry into force of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) brings with it preferential import tariff rates applicable to CPTPP originating goods. Import tariffs can amount to a substantial increase on the end cost of goods. For businesses operating in a competitive market, preferential tariff rates may afford them a comparative advantage by reducing costs. Under the CPTPP, tariff rate reductions occur automatically after the Agreement has entered into force in a member country’s territory. Accordingly, exporters of most CPTPP originating goods can enjoy preferential tariff rates immediately.

On April 18, 2019, the US International Trade Commission (ITC) released its 379 page report, U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement: Likely Impact on the U.S. Economy and on Specific Industry Sectors [Inv. TPA 105-003, Pub. No. 4889], as required by the section 105(c) of the Bipartisan Congressional Trade Priorities and Accountability Act of 2015 (Title I, Pub. L. 114-26; 129 Stat. 320).   The highlights of the report are contained in the Executive Summary which states (with emphasis as in the original text):

On April 18, 2019, the US International Trade Commission (ITC) released its 379 page report, U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement: Likely Impact on the U.S. Economy and on Specific Industry Sectors [Inv. TPA 105-003, Pub. No. 4889], as required by the section 105(c) of the Bipartisan Congressional Trade Priorities and Accountability Act of 2015 (Title I, Pub. L. 114-26; 129 Stat. 320).   The highlights of the report are contained in the Executive Summary which states (with emphasis as in the original text):

On April 15, 2019, the Department of Finance issued revised Lists of Steel, Aluminum and Other Goods Imported from the U.S. Subject to Remission of Countermeasures. The latest changes to Schedule 3 of the United States Surtax Remission Order (the “Remission Order”) were made pursuant to the Order Amending the United States Surtax Remission Order, No. 2019-1 and entered into force on April 15, 2019.

On April 9, 2019, the World Trade Organization released the Panel Report in United States – Anti-Dumping Measures Applying Differential Pricing Methodology to Softwood Lumber from Canada, WT/DS534/RThe decision addresses particular aspects of the US Department of Commerce’s methodology for calculating antidumping duties under the Antidumping Agreement (the Agreement on Implementation of Article VI of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 1994).  In some ways, the decision reiterates already-established principles – for example, Commerce may address perceived “targeted dumping” through the use of “zeroing” in its calculations.  In other ways, the decision sets up changes that may be necessary in the margin calculations.  After the 60-day period for appeal passes, it will be clearer whether the decision will affect future proceedings and if there is a new avenue for foreign producers to challenge Commerce’s practice domestically.